Image of Veal, Spinach and Tomato Arepas

Veal, Spinach and Tomato Arepas

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Serves: 4

  1. Pound veal cutlets into 1/4-1/8-inch thickness; cut into 1-inch strips. Place in bowl and toss with cumin and chili powder.

  2. In 12-inch, nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat olive oil. Cook veal strips 1-2 minutes. Remove veal to plate; keep warm. In same skillet over medium heat, cook green onions and garlic 2-3 minutes. Add tomatoes and salt; over high heat, heat to boil. Reduce heat to low; simmer 5 minutes until slightly reduced.

  3. Stir in spinach. Cook 3-4 minutes, or until spinach wilts and is tender. Return veal to skillet; heat through.

  4. To serve, heat skillet or griddle over medium heat. Toast arepas on each side until lightly browned and heated through, turning once.

  5. Cut each arepa in half horizontally. Top bottom half of each arepa with veal mixture. Sprinkle each with cheese; replace arepa tops.

Nutrition information per serving (1 arepa):
15 g protein;
12 g carbohydrate;
14 g fat;
5 g saturated fat;
50 mg cholesterol;
450 mg sodium;
2 g total sugars;
10% DV calcium;
10% DV iron.

SOURCE:
North American Meat Institute



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(NC) The sharing economy makes it easier for people or businesses to connect directly with others who can provide them with products and services they want.

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What are your tax obligations in the sharing economy?

There are various tax implications to consider when income is earned through the sharing economy:

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  • If you earn more than $30,000 in gross revenue over 12 consecutive months or less, you need to register for a GST/HST account, then start collecting and sending GST/HST to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

  • If you are earning money from ride-sharing platforms or considering operating a taxi, you need to register for GST/HST regardless of your earnings – even if you earn less than $30,000 annually.

  • If you earn less than $30,000, there are still advantages to registering voluntarily for a GST/HST account. If you do, you can claim input tax credits which can help you recover some of the GST/HST you paid.

Getting your reporting right can help you avoid interest and penalties later. Small business owners or self-employed individuals who need help understanding their tax obligations can ask for a free visit from a CRA Liaison Officer at:
Canada.ca/cra-liaison-officer.

For more information about tax considerations when working in the sharing economy, visit Canada.ca/taxes-sharing-economy.




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